McDonald's or Good Health? - Comments

  • butterfly lovers.

    butterfly lovers. (205)

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    I find this article to be well written and it definitely had me thinking. Although this is a one-sided article (for reasons you explained down below), you do have good claims and a good perspective.

    The title of the article is one that definitely has readers clicking, wanting to read the article. But that first sentence, starting off with a question, was what kept me reading. I agree with lennox that I think your word choice is what are setting people off lol. I think for an article like this, especially one that is biased, word choice is key. For me, you want to convince people why McDonald's is bad, and the best way to do that is to coax them. The article didn't feel "aggressive," necessarily, but it is a bit "harsh," in a way. Although it's not your fault since you are doing what was asked of you for your assignment. And maybe for this article, you should have included citations and had more sources to back up your claim.

    Overall, I think this was a well-written article, with little to no errors (better than what I could do back in middle school lol)!
    April 5th, 2019 at 11:28pm
  • not_ur_babe

    not_ur_babe (200)

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    Hello, everyone. I would just like to apologize for this article. I was in a middle school college class and this was just the topic I was given, so I fulfilled it. There was an outline and I did it all as I should have. I got an A on it. So even if you don't enjoy the style, this how the professor wanted it written.
    August 19th, 2016 at 12:17pm
  • warmaiden

    warmaiden (6085)

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    ah, nothing like the good old mcdonald's debate. i do agree w/ some of the commenters that perhaps getting not sides of the story would really enhance your article since all of this seems like a biased opinion though i fully agree w/ your claims.

    i feel like many people are either overreacting to some of your word choices partly bc they feel for one of each side or are even apart of those sides which i understand (tho, not the people who are lowkey aggressive of others since an opinion is to each their own).

    to put in my two cents: the decision for healthy choices & to really put a foot down & want to be considered as such is up to that specific person, but it's also hard to do as breaking this customary habit of immediate satisfaction (bc who doesn't like themselves some over caffeinated mcdonald's drinks? as i myself indulge in them from time to time) for deep fried or dangerously sweet substances.

    i do agree w/ trying to find healthier options as mcdonald's & other fast food places offer this. i can no longer eat that type of food anymore as i've become lactose intolerant & stomach sensitive to things like that. in itself, i see your perspective & have enjoyed this article c: thanks for posting this!
    August 1st, 2016 at 01:13am
  • I feel insane

    I feel insane (110)

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    I feel like the article could be improved by digging into both sides of the argument before siding with one specifically (you mention that people aren't considering healthier options, but you just leave it as that. If there are healthy options, then why choose the unhealthier ones instead?). In addition, the side you're vouching for could have stood out more if you had any sources backing up the "blaming obesity on McDonalds" mentality.

    None the less, I do agree with your overall opinion.
    May 27th, 2014 at 06:48pm
  • Deus Ex Machina

    Deus Ex Machina (150)

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    @ Lollipopstrings
    There's no unnecessary burden, so let people eat and smoke what they want. If they die earlier from their choices we all save money, and your opinion on this comes from an economic standpoint.
    May 26th, 2014 at 02:33pm
  • Lollipopstrings

    Lollipopstrings (100)

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    @ Deus Ex Machina
    A wee bit of a straw man. It's not so much the money, as it is the unecessary burden. I know we can't get rid of the elderly, nor is it something I want. When you pit someone who was born with preexisting health conditions(asthma, cancers, etc.), rather than something that is aquired (type 2 diabetes, hepatitis, etc.), you'll find that people are willing to champion for the former rather than the latter
    May 26th, 2014 at 08:57am
  • umngrrl

    umngrrl (100)

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    This misses the point, the reason people buy food like mcdonalds and junk food is because the economic situation in this country is such that they can't afford healthy food. it's great that mcdonalds added salads to the menu, but when you have 4 dollars and it has to feed you for the day your aren't getting a salad, you're getting the most filling thing you can. Additionally, milk may contain more nutrients but coffee is actually better for you at only 5 calories per 8 oz, and because it's a diuretic it flushes out toxins faster.
    May 25th, 2014 at 09:25pm
  • Deus Ex Machina

    Deus Ex Machina (150)

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    @ Lollipopstrings
    The elderly are by far the costliest patients, so we should start getting rid of them before we worry about the obese. Fatal diseases always return net-cost to healthcare so smoking is actually especially cheap because they die off fairly early on. Trying to curb nicotine addiction has cost the U.S. more money than it's saved.

    If you're concerned about money, you don't want people to make it to old age. It's better for them to die off earlier from things like poor eating habits and smoking. Here is an article detailing this in full.
    May 25th, 2014 at 02:38pm
  • Lollipopstrings

    Lollipopstrings (100)

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    @ Deus Ex Machina
    Except it is considering we have to shoulder the tax burden for people who continually make this choice. It's like smokers, except it's acceptable to deride them for their choices. Also, it's cheaper to eat healthy than to have to buy diabetic medication every month. When you'll pay 2.95 for a large soda but won't spend 3.00 on a dozen eggs, that says a lot about how people view their priorities.

    Now that this information is available as to how unhealthy it is, the onus is on the person choosing to substitute these meals instead of seeking healthy alternatives.
    May 25th, 2014 at 07:11am
  • AnonymousK

    AnonymousK (100)

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    To make your article more professional, you need sources and need to quit being so biased. Yes, I understand where you're coming from; however, there is usually two sides to every story and some common ground. All of these things can take away your credibility.

    You should really use sources, professional sources, to back up your information. Yes, we all know that soda is bad for you. We all know that caffeine, after worn off, leaves your body deflated. Where did you get your information? If you dig around some more you might be able to find more information. For example, you might learn that some salads, and other things we consider healthy, are actually worse for you than hamburgers and fries.

    Only some Americans blame fast food for being overweight. Your language choice indicates that you're saying all Americans feel this way.

    Something else that this article lacks is the second side to the story. Some restaurants have things like the dollar menu, which is all some families might be able to afford. To you and me that might sound insane, but it's true. If that is the case do families really have a say in what they eat? Your article also lacks common ground. What does each side have in common? Why do they have this in common?
    May 24th, 2014 at 06:11am
  • CountSynula

    CountSynula (100)

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    As someone who works at said restaurant, I'm well aware of how unhealthy the food is there so I agree. I try not to eat there as much as possible or if I do, I'll have a side salad or apples. I think a lot of our regular customers are aware too of the unhealthy food but they eat there regardless which is totally their choice. Like plenty of people said, they offer healthier choices and they show the nutrition/calorie facts on a lot more stuff now. So the information is there for people to plainly see. There should be no confusion, ya know, or reason for people to blame said place.

    With any general place that offers healthy and unhealthy choices, people have the choice and free will to choose. With nutrition facts placed on most everything, it would be silly for people to blame the food venders for making them overweight. It's not just limited to fast food. People could pick healthier foods at dine in restaurants or at the grocery.
    May 24th, 2014 at 06:08am
  • Haylie Jaed

    Haylie Jaed (325)

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    I agree with this 100%. I also hate the excuse, "It's so much cheaper to eat at McDonald's than it is at [insert healthier place here]!" or that it's so convenient.

    I worked at McDonald's for eight and a half years (I just left this March). For the first two years, I would eat McDonald's on my breaks. After that, I would only eat McDonald's whenever my family did - once a month or less. For the past two years, I have not eaten McDonald's at all.

    As an employee I got half price, and it was obviously very convenient for me to buy it - but I made the choice not to. I wouldn't even buy the salads there. For lunch I would bring something from home - an apple, a sandwich - and my co-workers would praise me. Whenever I said I didn't ever eat McDonald's, I'd get comments like, "I don't know how you do it!"

    I agree with @ Deus Ex Machina that all this "you should" business is a bit harsh. If people want to eat McDonald's, it's absolutely their right. But if they want to eat it and then complain that it is contributing to their health issues, maybe they should take a step back and think twice about what they're doing.
    May 24th, 2014 at 06:07am
  • Am.I.Pretty.Yet!?

    Am.I.Pretty.Yet!? (100)

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    It's definitely peoples's choice if they want to eat unhealthy. I agree with KatieElliot i could understand if it was a new restaurant maybe and nobody understood how unhealthy it was yet but for someone to blame fast food on their unhealthiness would be ridiculous. People are usually aware of how unhealthy it is but they choose to eat it. To blame your health on fast food is kinda of like the old gun debate. To guns kill people or do people kill people?
    May 24th, 2014 at 05:39am
  • Deus Ex Machina

    Deus Ex Machina (150)

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    Except it's none of your business if people want to eat unhealthy. That's they prerogative. All of this "you should, you should" is kind of haughty.
    May 24th, 2014 at 02:23am
  • KatieElliot

    KatieElliot (100)

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    May 24th, 2014 at 01:52am