Situations vs. Complications - Comments

  • lonely girl.

    lonely girl. (250)

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    This is so helpful! I'm definitely going to start writing out my situations and possible complications to make it clear cut and hopefully add some tension / conflict into my stories. Cute
    April 11th, 2019 at 04:05pm
  • padme;

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    Like other commenters have said, I haven't heard about situation or complication - and therefor didn't know the difference between them. That being said, you did an excellent job of explaining what each one is and why they're different. Though, as CallusedSilk pointed out, I think they're subjective. I also think that writing a story without a complication would be dreadfully boring - because then what'd be the point? - so, naturally, most stories have them, even if they're the same as the situation and even if we, the writers, don't know the difference between situation and complication.

    Anyway, I thought you did a really great job with the article - it made me laugh and was easy to follow along. So, claps for you! Clap (Sarcasm not intended.)
    October 8th, 2016 at 07:48am
  • warmaiden

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    i, like many, have never been taught situation vs. complication, but i think it was easier for me to find out the basis of it & really go from there when writing, though i'll admit to never really heeding it much attention. aka, i never really thought much of it.

    both commenters below me talked about the walking dead & twilight & though i do hate twilight w/ every little goddamn bone in me, i do agree that there was more to the situation & complication than that. im sure you picked twilight solely bc of how laughable it is & im not going to lie, i did get in a good cackle there. bc that's exactly how i see that story. bella swan, this emo kid, smells really good to vamps & blah, blah, blah. of course, the plot is more than that (if any fangirl can fangirl over it, this is probably true). as per the second season of the walking dead (& im only defending bc i love twd), w/ all the shit that happened in the first season, a little tugging of season two's plotline probably had to deal w/ the calm before the storm. & this is already what callusedsilk talked about.

    same w/ harry potter: & the goblet of fire bc i saw the situation & complication as "oh, harry's gonna die again!"

    regardless, this was a super easy article to follow & i got the gist of what you were saying whereas i could see why other people wouldn't. personally, i give you a thumbs up!
    June 30th, 2016 at 09:31pm
  • HurtTheOnesILove

    HurtTheOnesILove (100)

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    This article cracked me up
    February 25th, 2016 at 10:22pm
  • CallusedSilk

    CallusedSilk (100)

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    I did appreciate this article. It was well written with only a couple errors that I noticed (putting 'want's' instead of 'wants' and putting 'third dimensional' instead of 'three dimensional'.), but I will point out that this isn't as easy to figure out as this article makes it seem.

    All of the examples can easily be twisted to either be good examples or bad examples depending on how the reader is interpreting it. Someone already pointed out with Twilight, but with Walking Dead, I interpreted season 2 beginning more as the situation being that it's a zombie apocalypse and they want somewhere to settle. The complication then was that the owner is hoarding zombies on the property and then the whole damn places catches on fire.

    On the other hand, while I personally agree with the Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire example, someone else could have read the book and seen both the situation and complication as 'Harry Potter goes to Hogwarts and once again is almost killed'.

    So what I'm trying to say is that while I do appreciate someone explaining the difference between situation and complication, I would like to see it made clear that these are subjective.
    August 28th, 2015 at 02:21am
  • This.Useless.Heart.

    This.Useless.Heart. (115)

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    This is a really neat tip! I'm gonna try to analyze my stories and see what the situations and complications are in them, and I also intend to keep this stuff in mind whenever I start on new projects! Thanks for posting. Very Happy
    August 19th, 2015 at 02:18am
  • LongLiveMontrose

    LongLiveMontrose (100)

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    like many others, I have never been taught the difference between a situation and a complication. So, thank you so much for writing this incredibly informative piece. I'm currently creating a storyboard for a story that I'm writing, and this has honestly changed the way that I perceived how to piece together the larger pieces of plot. Anyway, I just wanted to stop by and say thank you so much.
    August 18th, 2015 at 10:48pm
  • jason todd.

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    @ clint barton.

    You are right. There are multiple situation/complications in Twilight and the one you said is one of them.

    I used that particular one because I know a lot of people have all said 'wow Bella smells good that's all that's going on, like???' and I knew it would be a good example for people to recognize the difference between complications and situations.
    August 16th, 2015 at 10:58pm
  • clint barton.

    clint barton. (115)

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    First off, thank you for posting this because I think this is a topic that many people have never been exposed to.

    But -- and I never thought I'd see the day where I actually defended the writing in Twilight -- isn't the situation for that book that Bella is moving to a new town, while the complication is that that new town has a vampire family in it and she apparently smells good to vampires? Doesn't that make the situation and complication actually different?
    August 16th, 2015 at 02:54pm
  • abigail.

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    Thank you so much for this, because I'll be 100% honest: my situations and complications are usually the same thing. I'd never been taught the differences. THANK YOU.
    August 16th, 2015 at 09:03am
  • Nereid

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    I really liked this:) It was a simple but effective way of helping people develop their writing skills dramatically without the hours of practise. You also did good research into this article and the way you presented your ideas was great too.
    August 16th, 2015 at 01:00am