Brexit: Why People Voted Leave - Comments

  • Unown

    Unown (190)

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    @ LipstickAndDrugs
    It's crazy to think that some people (like that man) actually say such horrible things. Facepalm

    Nigel Farage, among other politicians who never keep their words, are the reason why I didn't vote. I didn't feel that I could afford the time to do my own unbiased research. I personally thought those leaflets about staying in/out the EU didn't give good enough information and were far too short. I know it seems bad - not to vote, but because I was undecided (and still am) I thought it best not to vote rather than vote blindly.
    I actually know a few young people who voted leave, and it was not for racist reasons but rather to do with the EU legislation relating to their line of work/businesses I believe.

    I'm not sure of the source relating to that information about the government reducing funding for the NHS in order to privatise healthcare, but if it were true the government had better reduce taxes accordingly! First, though, they should cut down on the money given to people for popping out more babies for the sake of receiving more money. Having more children should be discouraged rather than encouraged, in my opinion!
    August 28th, 2016 at 09:02pm
  • LipstickAndDrugs

    LipstickAndDrugs (100)

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    I've found in my area of Britain that xenophobia and bitterness towards the youth are the reason for voting Leave. I was in a pub with some friends the Monday after the vote when we over heard some people of the older generation talking about their vote, one of them said the voted remain because his grandchild was into politics and said that to remain is probably the best option for the UK. His friend had voted leave because, and I quote "To payback all those sh*ts", his friend, as well as myself and my friends were shocked at what that man had said.

    For the past few weeks since the vote we've been facing a huge amount of racism towards Muslims as well, in particular Islamic women who wear hijabs. One man ripped a woman's hijab off and shouted "You saw we don't want you here. Go back to where you came from!" This woman was from Bangledesh but there have been many other instances where the victim was born and raised in the UK and their family probably has deeper British values than almost all British people. The same has happened to anyone from a different country, my university has had to send emails out on a regular basis to tell the foreign students that despite everything in the news that is happening in my area that they will be safe come the new academic year.

    From what I've seen of some Leave voters from the rest of the country though (mainly the ones who have said they would change their vote if given a chance) is that they voted Leave based on what the politicians said, primarily, Nigel Farage, like £350000000 going towards the NHS (despite the government actually taking funding away each year to make it look like we shouldn't have it and to eventually privatise our health service again)
    August 11th, 2016 at 01:49am
  • lozzieee who.

    lozzieee who. (610)

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    @ oneofthemcrazies

    Well, from a third parties perspective it's very well done, especially considering it wasn't brilliantly reported in the rest of the world. It's informative enough for someone who doesn't know the first thing about the event. I think us, as Britons, are still salty of it all because the press has been so bad and the result has caused a lot of uproar and problems in our political climate and just in general in the public. I think you did a great job reporting Brexit from an outsiders perspective, especially given the information surrounding it which oftentimes is biased. I hope we didn't insult your writing with our views; like I said, it's still a sore subject for us with the remain camp using xenophobia as a retaliation for the result.
    July 19th, 2016 at 05:29pm
  • holmesinthetardis

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    @ Mr. Darcy @ MissAustenRegrets @ lozzieee who.

    A point to note is that I reported Brexit from a third party's perspective. I didn't know what Brexit was until it came on television so I researched on it. And I do admit that I might have generalized the Leave side but the thing is, I did talk to a bunch of people and after watching a number of events, it did come out as xenophobia was the reason. I mean, if you look at it from my perspective, there really did seem no reason for it to take place to begin with because the Union, what with all of its flaws, still kind of seems like a haven. I'm sorry if the article came out a bit biased but it was my first attempt at writing anything like that and obviously I'm going to get better with time. Hopefully I'll do a better job next time. Thanks for the feedback!
    July 18th, 2016 at 09:11pm
  • lozzieee who.

    lozzieee who. (610)

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    @ Mr. Darcy @ MissAustenRegrets

    On the opposite end of the scale, I voted Remain and have my own reasons for doing so. As stated in the article, I enjoyed at least the premise of studying and working in the members states easily in the near future. But even I resent the idea that the argument for Leave was purely xenophobic.

    I believe sovereignty was the basis of the Leave vote. And that's okay - in the hundreds of years of legal and political history of the UK, only 44 of them have seen the British government not wholly supreme. Our laws should be our laws without outsider influence; it's what makes our legal system so flexible and in general well-rounded.

    However, I do believe neither side presented a decent argument. In fact, there was a significant amount of biased and false information spread from both the Leave and Remain camps. That swayed the vote incredibly. We as British people do not have access to politics and law and rights like they do in most other countries with a 'proper' constitution, and thus we cannot be expected to fully understand the consequences of such a vote without doing our own deep research and really, who honestly has time for that?

    Neither side of the vote can be wholly painted as educated or uneducated, young or old, right wing or left. Most only thought of the fiscal and immigration implications of leaving or staying when there is so much more to the EU than that, as well as the fact that the majority of what people see as 'problematic' immigrants are actually from the outside of the member states, usually from Asia. And there was absolutely no argument in the news outlining the idea that yes, we save over £100bn in payments to the EU, but we have also lost a similar amount in bonus' form the EU that will come from our own economy anyway.

    Yes, the free movement of people and open borders has left us with a quite severe unemployment problem, that I cannot dispute. But has the government and the countries companies done anything to help with this? No. Will leaving the EU mend this problem? Probably not. British people will argue for a fairer wage than an immigrant will thus companies will offer less positions to compensate the loss and to turn the same profit as it did from it's lower paid, non-British workers. It's sad, but it's true.

    I suppose, despite the differences of opinion and the warring facts, I find it abhorrent to dislike someone or paint them a racist simply because they chose to have an independent government in control of its own laws and economy. Whilst on a political level I disagree with the Leave vote and would rather it overturned, the public voted this way and we must deal with the fallout, good or bad. We have absolutely no idea how this will go because it is pretty much unprecedented, but we will face the consequences as only the British could: in the pub, complaining either way.

    And I agree with the both of you. This article, while well written and relatively balanced, was just a comprehensive rehash of what we already know. I was hoping for something with more depth and fact. Still, well done on the style and for highlighting to those who have no prior knowledge what the hell this whole 'Brexit' thing is about.
    July 17th, 2016 at 08:59pm
  • Mr. Darcy

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    @ MissAustenRegrets
    I do absolutely agree that people did vote for the wrong reasons, but it's wrong to tar us all with the same brush. You mostly only hear of the people who voted for racist reasons which is gross bias, and this just seems to run with that. When writing an article on another country's decision or politics, you're supposed to extensively research further than just the basic international reporting otherwise it turns into a rather uninformed article. I just felt that this article didn't even attempt to look at the EU further than the immigration that occurs within it.
    July 4th, 2016 at 07:34pm
  • MissAustenRegrets

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    @ Mr. Darcy

    I don't think she's completely wrong though. You have to admit there's a good bunch of people in this country who've voted for the wrong reasons. I voted leave too because of the waste of foodstuff under the EU. But obviously this won't be reported internationally. They love a good sob story and Brexit has provided that to them. I just hope logic wins this over and all the biased people mentioned in the article (who've captured headlines) don't end up defining our country.
    July 4th, 2016 at 06:53pm
  • Mr. Darcy

    Mr. Darcy (16090)

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    I read this article with an open-mind, expecting that it might focus on more analysis on what's been reported in the media and try and give a cohesive argument about the reasons behind the result. While it was certainly a cohesive article, it didn't feel like an argument that tried to go in a new direction. I've read this line of discussion several times before and it gets old when each one tries to boil it down to uneducated people who are racist decided to vote just to get the immigrants out. While there is no doubt that immigration played a big part in the Leave campaign and was a big reason why the EU grew more disliked over the years, the result stems from so much more than just that.

    You have this line which seems to allude to the idea that the people who voted Leave, when saying that it was nothing to do with racism, are lying and that it's the sole reason behind everyone vote:

    "And so even though most will argue that it’s nothing to do with racism, xenophobia and so on, that is definitely what’s going on."

    How do you know? Your lack of evidence doesn't convince me, nor does the fact that I was a Leave voter and my vote was down to the fact that I firmly believe the Union is crumbling, that it's on its last legs, and had we stayed we would've fallen with it.

    "In fact, it can only affect the economy as a whole."

    How about the fishermen who were affected by their laws? Or the people who lost their jobs when the EU decided to give UK based companies grants to take their company to another EU country? I would argue that being in the EU and having their quotas and laws and regulations affects far more than just the economy.

    This feels like an article that just rehashed the same articles that have already been published that are out of touch with the actual British people and decided to just use immigration as its excuse, much like both Leave and Remain decided to focus their campaigns around. It might be an issue but there are far more issues than just that.
    June 29th, 2016 at 04:57am