English Words That Are Different in the UK and USA

  • Einahpets

    Einahpets (150)

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    I didn't think there were very many of them but Katy Perry and Chris Moyles were talking about it on the radio and there's a lot more than I thought. I'm just wondering how many there are.
    If you don't know what I mean, it's things like, in the UK we call it the boot of the car, but in America it's called the trunk.
    Or pavement and sidewalk.
    Things like that.
    June 12th, 2009 at 12:32pm
  • chlorotin.

    chlorotin. (100)

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    All I know is in America it`s soccer, and in the UK its football.
    :XD
    June 12th, 2009 at 04:27pm
  • sansa.

    sansa. (250)

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    Mom and Mum.
    And cell phones and mobile phones.

    Can't think of anymore
    :XD
    June 12th, 2009 at 07:36pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    Fanny.
    It means 'butt' in America, but apparently means vagina over in the U.K.
    June 12th, 2009 at 08:20pm
  • SignalFire

    SignalFire (100)

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    Shopping Carts are Shopping Trolleys.
    Chips are crisps
    Fries are chips.
    Football is soccer
    the trunk of a car is called a boot.

    There are others I just can't think them right now.
    Oh and Dru "fanny" means vagina over here but it's also an old English girls name
    June 12th, 2009 at 08:56pm
  • cracked polystyrene

    cracked polystyrene (100)

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    We say 'rubbish' and Americans say 'garbage'
    That's a pretty obvious one, but it's the best I could think of for now. xD
    June 12th, 2009 at 09:55pm
  • Syd Barrett.

    Syd Barrett. (100)

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    "Bum" means "butt" in the UK. But in the States, it's a term for a hobo. Or, alternatively, a useless/lazy person.

    British say "second name" and Americans say "middle name," I think. And the British call the toilet the "loo." Also, while Americans usually say "go to the bathroom", British are more likely to say "go to the toilet."

    The term "fag" means "cigarette" in Britain, but in America it means a gay man or boy. And in Britain, "jumper" means "sweater", while in the States, it means a kind of dress.

    Oh, and what Americans call trash/garbage cans, the British call dustbins.
    June 12th, 2009 at 10:42pm
  • Matt Smith

    Matt Smith (900)

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    My English treacher gave me a worksheet with loads on but I've forgotten most.

    Faucet meaning tap. Clerk meaning shop assistant. Fag meaning cigarette. Freeway or highway as opposed to motorway. Drugstore instead of pharmacy or chemist. I don't know what 'grits' are but we don't have them, unless it's the salt and dirt to put on the roads in winter.

    Another interesting one is Sheriff. It's still used in Scotland, I think, but not in England anymore. Unless it's an archaic use.
    June 12th, 2009 at 10:47pm
  • Matt Smith

    Matt Smith (900)

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    Sandwich-Masta:
    "Bum" means "butt" in the UK. But in the States, it's a term for a hobo. Or, alternatively, a useless/lazy person.
    Bum can also be a surprisingly versatile verb. xD
    It could mean 'to borrow'. Like 'can I bum a fag'. Or if you bum something, you love it or obsess over it. I'm not so keen on that one. Or 'to bum around' can be to just hang around, waste time, etc.

    It could be in America for all I know.
    June 12th, 2009 at 10:51pm
  • strange.

    strange. (310)

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    Sandwich-Masta:
    British say "second name" and Americans say "middle name," I think.
    I've always said middle name omgno:
    I've never met anyone that calls it a second name :XD

    In America it's anchor, but in the UK we say newsreader/presenter :file:
    June 12th, 2009 at 11:09pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    Sandwich-Masta:
    "Bum" means "butt" in the UK. But in the States, it's a term for a hobo. Or, alternatively, a useless/lazy person.
    We also use 'bum' to mean 'butt'.
    Bloodraine:
    Bum can also be a surprisingly versatile verb. xD
    It could mean 'to borrow'. Like 'can I bum a fag'. Or if you bum something, you love it or obsess over it. I'm not so keen on that one. Or 'to bum around' can be to just hang around, waste time, etc.

    It could be in America for all I know.
    We use it to mean 'borrow' as well, but not the other two.
    June 13th, 2009 at 01:52am
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    Bloodraine:
    Faucet meaning tap. Clerk meaning shop assistant. Fag meaning cigarette. Freeway or highway as opposed to motorway. Drugstore instead of pharmacy or chemist.
    We have 'tap water' or water 'straight from the tap'. But we usually use faucet as the actual device, yes.
    And we do have drugstores. I work at one.
    June 13th, 2009 at 01:54am
  • obscene.

    obscene. (510)

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    druscilla's suicide.:
    Bloodraine:
    Bum can also be a surprisingly versatile verb. xD
    It could mean 'to borrow'. Like 'can I bum a fag'. Or if you bum something, you love it or obsess over it. I'm not so keen on that one. Or 'to bum around' can be to just hang around, waste time, etc.

    It could be in America for all I know.
    We use it to mean 'borrow' as well, but not the other two.
    Around here we use it in all those ways.
    To borrow, to love, to hang around, be a hobo, butt, and occasionally a pet's name.
    :tehe:

    Where I am, we use a lot of UK slang.
    June 13th, 2009 at 02:20am
  • cups and cakes.

    cups and cakes. (100)

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    Sandwich-Masta:
    Oh, and what Americans call trash/garbage cans, the British call dustbins.
    NZ language is very much influenced by the Brits (duh, they found us). Everyone I know says "rubbish bin." :shifty
    June 13th, 2009 at 02:46am
  • Mrs Carpetlegs

    Mrs Carpetlegs (200)

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    Liquor store is an off liscence.
    Commercials are adverts.
    Bog/loo means toilet.
    Pants are trousers.
    When we go to the toilet we do not say "going to the bathroom" they are called "Toilets."
    Janitors are Caretakers.
    Parking lots are carparks.
    Thumbtacks are drawing pins.
    Erasers are rubbers.
    That's all I have for now.
    June 13th, 2009 at 03:06am
  • adjacent.justice

    adjacent.justice (100)

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    My friend from England calls ordinary trucks here (like Jeeps and that) landrovers.

    He says that's what they call them. And a garrage, you know, what we keep cars in, is pronounced, there: "Gare-ige" instead of: "Gar-rahge".

    Pisses me off. When he starts using Britain terms when we talk on the phone.
    June 13th, 2009 at 04:02am
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    lochnessmonster:
    Erasers are rubbers.
    And here rubbers are condoms.
    :tehe:
    June 13th, 2009 at 07:56am
  • vonny

    vonny (355)

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    druscilla's suicide.:
    lochnessmonster:
    Erasers are rubbers.
    And here rubbers are condoms.
    :tehe:
    In Australia, we call erasers rubbers as well. I remember finding out what rubber was another name for and was all "wtf. The two objects aren't even similar!" :tehe:
    June 13th, 2009 at 08:29am
  • ChemicallyImbalanced

    ChemicallyImbalanced (1365)

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    ^I think everyone goes through that stage in primary school and no one wants to say rubber in fear of sounding silly, but we get over it. :XD
    Bloodraine:
    Faucet meaning tap. Clerk meaning shop assistant. Fag meaning cigarette. Freeway or highway as opposed to motorway. Drugstore instead of pharmacy or chemist.
    I always wondered what they meant by drugstores. :cheese: I kept thinking it was a newsagency. A chemist makes more sense.

    Also, Americans say ketchup and Australian's say tomato sauce.
    Where does the word 'ketchup' even come from?
    June 13th, 2009 at 08:57am
  • vonny

    vonny (355)

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    Ketchup is the same as tomato sauce? I thought it was a different thing altogether. o.o
    June 13th, 2009 at 11:12am