English Words That Are Different in the UK and USA

  • MORANG

    MORANG (100)

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    are their any british equivelants to the words cu'h or ike?
    February 5th, 2011 at 10:22pm
  • Angelus.

    Angelus. (100)

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    ^
    After finding out how to use it, I think 'ike' = 'mate'. I have no idea what 'cu'h' means or how to use it, though...
    March 27th, 2011 at 11:51pm
  • Monroe;

    Monroe; (615)

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    In Ireland :

    Gaff = house.
    Bure = girl.
    Feen = boy.
    Feek/fla = had sex with someone / or calling someone sexy looking.
    March 28th, 2011 at 02:19pm
  • red bandit.

    red bandit. (100)

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    torch - flashlight
    trainers - sneakers
    jumpers - hoodies

    uhm, those are mainly the ones i remember from my counselors from the UK. there were many more, i mean some were just different spellings.

    like aluminum vs. aluminium. personally, i like the latter more. it sounds better :D
    June 8th, 2011 at 05:37am
  • DeadlyOverDose

    DeadlyOverDose (100)

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    Apparently ramps that you exit off of are called slick roads. I can thank my GPS for this one, considering it kept telling me to "take slick road" and I was looking for a street named slick. haha
    June 19th, 2011 at 06:44am
  • wxyz

    wxyz (240)

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    ^ In Britain they're slip roads.
    June 19th, 2011 at 06:48pm
  • Bob Dylan.

    Bob Dylan. (115)

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    I don't know whether this counts...
    Mum = Mom
    July 7th, 2011 at 02:51pm
  • wxyz

    wxyz (240)

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    Is it me or do Canada share more slang with UK than with the US? I hear Canadians saying bum rather than butt quite a bit. XD Stuff like that.

    My favourites between the UK and US are the swearing variations. Weird
    Shite > Shit
    Arse > Ass
    October 3rd, 2011 at 01:04pm
  • Monroe;

    Monroe; (615)

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    From Ireland:

    Bure - Girl
    Feen - Boy
    Fla - sex/sexy
    Mog/Muppet - Idiot
    October 3rd, 2011 at 02:22pm
  • The Master

    The Master (15)

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    Alex; oxytocin.:
    Is it me or do Canada share more slang with UK than with the US? I hear Canadians saying bum rather than butt quite a bit. XD Stuff like that.

    My favourites between the UK and US are the swearing variations. Weird
    Shite > Shit
    Arse > Ass
    Arse has a bit more...rarr to it than ass. That and ass just sounds silly which is why I can't take the slang "asshole" seriously.

    ---

    Some Scottish Slang!

    Fitpad - Unpleasant person.
    Hoormaister - Manslut/Pimp.
    Eejit - Idiot.
    Glaikit - Stupid-looking.
    Ya Dancer!/Yaldi! - Exclaimation of delight.
    Skiving - Slacking.
    Numpty - Idiot.
    Steamin' - Drunk.
    Blootered - Drunk.
    Gallus - Brilliant.
    Crabbit - Misery-guts.
    How - Why. (i.e. How no? / Why not?)
    October 3rd, 2011 at 04:19pm
  • Cuckoo

    Cuckoo (100)

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    Not Britain but in Ireland we say
    Gogo/Bobble- hair ties
    The jacks- toilet (mainly used by older men xD)
    To meet someone- french kiss them
    To shift- to make out
    Scobe- chav/ slut
    Rapid- cool, neat, as opposed to fast
    Press- a cupboard Taking him off- to imitate someone/ mock them
    That's grand- that's fine/ that's okay
    November 30th, 2011 at 01:37am
  • Ktulu

    Ktulu (100)

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    If the whole biscuit, cookie, scone thing hasn't been cleared up, here's what I've been taught in culinary school

    US cookies are pretty much the same thing as UK biscuits and vary about just as much. Biscotti are cookies, or biscuits, that have been baked twice.

    US biscuits are about as dry as a UK scone but are normally cut instead of dropped, although either or can be interchangeable and UK scones tend to be on the sweet end (I think) while US biscuits are pretty much always savory.

    US style scones are like muffins in the shape of triangles but tend to be a little more dry and are sweet. The batter is thicker then that of a muffin as well, allowing to be baked without anything but a sheet pan.

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    In the US, we pronounce the letter "z" as zee, but in Canada, they pronounce it as zed. Is it different in the UK too?
    September 8th, 2013 at 10:03am
  • Mr. Darcy

    Mr. Darcy (16090)

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    @ Ktulu
    We pronounce it zed. I can't stand when someone says zee. Twitch
    September 8th, 2013 at 12:29pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    According to Emma Watson, a "rubber" in Britain is like a pencil eraser, whereas a "rubber" in America is a condom.
    September 9th, 2013 at 04:59pm
  • Name Of Misery.

    Name Of Misery. (100)

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    gonna hear dru roar.:
    According to Emma Watson, a "rubber" in Britain is like a pencil eraser, whereas a "rubber" in America is a condom.
    My German foreign exchange student learned British English, and when she asked a teacher [here] for a rubber the teacher almost died.
    September 10th, 2013 at 03:30am
  • Ktulu

    Ktulu (100)

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    @ castiel's vessel
    lol, I've been singing the ABC song in my head and it just sounds too definite in calling "z" zed
    September 11th, 2013 at 10:35pm
  • carpe diem;

    carpe diem; (115)

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    I say 'pants' when something's bad. Like 'this film is pants!'

    Snog. XD
    Trousers
    Knickers
    Joggers = sweatpants

    Oh, and I call going to the cinema or the movies 'going to the pictures' but I've no idea if it's even just a British thing, but I never see Americans saying it.
    September 12th, 2013 at 12:50pm
  • Ktulu

    Ktulu (100)

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    @ Carpe diem;

    Lol, my dad says "going to the movies" as "going to the show house"
    September 14th, 2013 at 01:48am
  • carpe diem;

    carpe diem; (115)

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    @ Ktulu
    Well I've never heard that one before. lmfao
    September 14th, 2013 at 02:08am
  • Captain Serious

    Captain Serious (100)

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    I hope no one else has said this already.

    What I've noticed is that when shortening the phrase "I have not" in a sentence, a person from the UK is more likely to say "I've not" while a person from North America is more likely to say "I haven't" ... has anyone else noticed this?

    ex. I've not called mum about the broken lift, vs I haven't called mom about the broken elevator.
    September 16th, 2013 at 07:45am