English Words That Are Different in the UK and USA

  • bona drag.

    bona drag. (935)

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    In America, people have to pee. They do not "need a wee." Shifty

    Also, my friend sent me this asking if it was accurate before. Figured I'd share for the laughs.

    Image
    September 17th, 2013 at 09:04am
  • CassyChaos

    CassyChaos (100)

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    I'll always remember telling someone in USA I was knackered (as in exhausted), they didn't understand me, so I opted for saying shattered instead meaning the same thing and still they didn't get it...
    January 27th, 2014 at 04:43am
  • wxyz

    wxyz (240)

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    Captain Serious:
    I hope no one else has said this already.

    What I've noticed is that when shortening the phrase "I have not" in a sentence, a person from the UK is more likely to say "I've not" while a person from North America is more likely to say "I haven't" ... has anyone else noticed this?

    ex. I've not called mum about the broken lift, vs I haven't called mom about the broken elevator.
    I think "I haven't" is more common here, but "I've not" is definitely used, and I say it more often than not.
    January 27th, 2014 at 02:23pm
  • nearly witches.

    nearly witches. (15250)

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    The Master:
    Some Scottish Slang!

    Fitpad - Unpleasant person.
    Hoormaister - Manslut/Pimp.
    Eejit - Idiot.
    Glaikit - Stupid-looking.
    Ya Dancer!/Yaldi! - Exclaimation of delight.
    Skiving - Slacking.
    Numpty - Idiot.
    Steamin' - Drunk.
    Blootered - Drunk.
    Gallus - Brilliant.
    Crabbit - Misery-guts.
    How - Why. (i.e. How no? / Why not?)
    Yaldi is one of my favourite words on this planet, even if I only use it in a joking way. tehe

    Some more:
    Bawbag - again, unpleasant person
    Hammered - drunk (I think everyone uses that though)
    Pished - drunk
    Gowpin' (sp?) - really, really sore
    Whit - what
    Gonnae - going to
    Reekin' - smelly
    Ken - know
    Chib - stab (tehe)
    Square go - fight
    Lassie - girl
    Dod - a bit (i.e. a dod of milk / a bit of milk)
    Hogmanay - New Year's Eve (apparently only Scotland call it Hogmanay -- how?)
    Wee - small
    Am - I am
    January 31st, 2014 at 11:31am
  • carpe diem;

    carpe diem; (115)

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    @ Captain Serious
    I definitely say 'I've not' more than 'I haven't'

    Also, wank -masturbate.
    February 26th, 2014 at 03:03pm
  • the god of mischief.

    the god of mischief. (250)

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    United States
    Captain Serious:
    I hope no one else has said this already.

    What I've noticed is that when shortening the phrase "I have not" in a sentence, a person from the UK is more likely to say "I've not" while a person from North America is more likely to say "I haven't" ... has anyone else noticed this?

    ex. I've not called mum about the broken lift, vs I haven't called mom about the broken elevator.
    I'm American and I say "I've not" more than I say "I haven't", especially whilst being sarcastic, though I couldn't tell you why.... -shrug-

    Duck/Ducky (this is much older, or so I'm told) = A close friend.
    Christian name = First name and not your Baptized/Saint name.
    Clot = Thickly stupid (as a Biology minor I find this turn of phrase pleasing. tehe )
    Hooter = Nose.
    April 25th, 2014 at 06:26am