Do You Have Different Beliefs from Friends and Family?

  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    passion paradox:
    I'm not sure, but does anyone believe in the Bible Stories?
    I've always been iffy on the stories, like the story of Adam and Eve. I don't really believe everything as it was relayed in the bible. I think the story of the forbidden fruit and temptation is suppose to be the reason for why society is the way it is. I just don't think God would create the tree of knowledge, if he didn't want anyone to eat from it?
    I believe in Bible stories as metaphors. I don't think they're meant to be taken literally.
    April 11th, 2011 at 12:10am
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    dru shoots up.:
    ^
    Most churches make the child choose to be baptized. Infants are christened.
    That's not necessarily true. Where I'm from the religion is mostly Catholic and babies are always baptized in churches. They have no say, obviously since they can't even talk yet.
    April 11th, 2011 at 01:24am
  • callisto

    callisto (100)

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    dru shoots up.:
    I believe in Bible stories as metaphors. I don't think they're meant to be taken literally.
    Ahh, Ok I didn't understand. I was raised to know that Adam and Eve literally were the first of mankind and such. That makes sense, to me, it's kind of like the Ancient Greek Myths.
    April 11th, 2011 at 02:32am
  • ThePiesEndure

    ThePiesEndure (115)

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    passion paradox:
    Ahh, Ok I didn't understand. I was raised to know that Adam and Eve literally were the first of mankind and such. That makes sense, to me, it's kind of like the Ancient Greek Myths.
    I read that it wasn't until the 18th Century that the first five books of the Bible were considered literal tales by people in the Church. Back in Jesus' time the Old testament tales were just that, tales to help explain how the world came about. They weren't meant to be taken literally.
    April 11th, 2011 at 12:38pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    Jewel Nicole:
    That's not necessarily true. Where I'm from the religion is mostly Catholic and babies are always baptized in churches. They have no say, obviously since they can't even talk yet.
    But they have the choice to be confirmed or not when they're older. Also, when people from non-Catholic denominations which are not too different from Catholicism (e.g. Anglicanism or Orthodoxy) convert to Catholicism, they're only confirmed as Catholics, they don't have to get baptized again.
    April 11th, 2011 at 07:18pm
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    But they have the choice to be confirmed or not when they're older. Also, when people from non-Catholic denominations which are not too different from Catholicism (e.g. Anglicanism or Orthodoxy) convert to Catholicism, they're only confirmed as Catholics, they don't have to get baptized again.
    Which was why I said baptized not confirmed.
    April 11th, 2011 at 08:11pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    Jewel Nicole:
    Which was why I said baptized not confirmed.
    Actually, you said baptized not christened - and baptism without confirmation is essentially christening.
    April 11th, 2011 at 09:30pm
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    Actually, you said baptized not christened - and baptism without confirmation is essentially christening.
    It's called baptism, not christening, where I'm from and I'm talking about in catholic churches, which I said.
    April 12th, 2011 at 12:42am
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    Jewel Nicole:
    It's called baptism, not christening, where I'm from and I'm talking about in catholic churches, which I said.
    Just because something is called one thing somewhere doesn't mean it's not actually called something else someplace else - while being the exact same thing.
    April 12th, 2011 at 12:48am
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    Just because something is called one thing somewhere doesn't mean it's not actually called something else someplace else - while being the exact same thing.
    I just took it as if you were correcting me, if you weren't, fine, that's just how I saw it.
    April 12th, 2011 at 01:16am
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    Jewel Nicole:
    I just took it as if you were correcting me, if you weren't, fine, that's just how I saw it.
    I was because you thought that infant baptism without confirmation is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism. Which isn't true.
    April 12th, 2011 at 11:05am
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    I was because you thought that infant baptism without confirmation is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism. Which isn't true.
    When did I say this? Shifty
    April 12th, 2011 at 08:15pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    Jewel Nicole:
    Mr W. H.:
    I was because you thought that infant baptism without confirmation is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism. Which isn't true.
    When did I say this? Shifty
    Jewel Nicole:
    Quote
    Most churches make the child choose to be baptized. Infants are christened.
    That's not necessarily true. Where I'm from the religion is mostly Catholic and babies are always baptized in churches. They have no say, obviously since they can't even talk yet.
    If that doesn't mean that Catholic infant baptism is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism, I don't know what it could mean.
    April 13th, 2011 at 12:55pm
  • ThePiesEndure

    ThePiesEndure (115)

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    Mr W. H.:
    If that doesn't mean that Catholic infant baptism is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism, I don't know what it could mean.
    Christening is different to baptism, though, isn't it?
    April 13th, 2011 at 01:23pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    the mice endure:
    Christening is different to baptism, though, isn't it?
    Christening is infant baptism. The thing is that regular baptism (in non-modern denominations) has two parts - the dunking into water/ receiving God's Grace and a name part (that's why it's called christening - the baby gets their Christian name through it) and the confirmation or Chrismation - which 'seals' the person's commitment to God and enables them to receive the Eucharist and be responsible for their actions/sins.
    April 13th, 2011 at 02:07pm
  • ThePiesEndure

    ThePiesEndure (115)

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    Mr W. H.:
    Christening is infant baptism. The thing is that regular baptism (in non-modern denominations) has two parts - the dunking into water/ receiving God's Grace and a name part (that's why it's called christening - the baby gets their Christian name through it) and the confirmation or Chrismation - which 'seals' the person's commitment to God and enables them to receive the Eucharist and be responsible for their actions/sins.
    So, infant baptism doesn't have confirmation? Whereas regular baptism, does?
    April 13th, 2011 at 02:41pm
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    If that doesn't mean that Catholic infant baptism is different from christening and the same thing as regular baptism, I don't know what it could mean.
    I understand that in some traditions in can be referred to as christening, I'm not denying that. However, in the traditions where I'm from it's called baptism not christening.
    April 13th, 2011 at 10:31pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

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    the mice endure:
    So, infant baptism doesn't have confirmation? Whereas regular baptism, does?
    Yes, in Catholic churches. You only get confirmed when you're old enough to understand your faith and commit to it. If you're already old enough, there's no need to wait to get a confirmation, you get it right after the christening/first part of the baptism. Baptism is both receiving God's Grace and affirming your faith in Him - churches which practice infant baptism think children need God's Grace just as much as adults do so they perform that part of the baptism which offers children God's Grace as soon as possible, but wait until the child is older for their declaration of faith.
    Jewel Nicole:
    I understand that in some traditions in can be referred to as christening, I'm not denying that. However, in the traditions where I'm from it's called baptism not christening.
    And I've said before that the fact that it's not called christening where you live, doesn't mean it's not christening.
    April 13th, 2011 at 11:45pm
  • Jewel Nicole

    Jewel Nicole (100)

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    Mr W. H.:
    And I've said before that the fact that it's not called christening where you live, doesn't mean it's not christening.
    It doesn't meant it's not called baptism either. Shifty
    April 14th, 2011 at 12:43am
  • stupidshit

    stupidshit (100)

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    I am an Atheist living in the Bible Belt. I cannot count the number of physical fights I've gotten in because of this. My family also is rather...unhappy with my religious choices.
    But hey. Oh well. As long as you're happy with what you believe in, never give up on it. Even if you believe in nothing.
    May 8th, 2011 at 06:23am