Unique Customs/Phases in other Countries

  • xiluvmusicx

    xiluvmusicx (110)

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    What are some of the strange customs/sayings that you've seen in other countries? For example:
    Country: Britain
    Custom: Lou means bathroom

    This might help the people getting ready to go into other countries feel more at ease knowing what to expect.
    November 25th, 2009 at 10:39pm
  • Universal Trance

    Universal Trance (100)

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    Well, My friends from China and she told me once that in China you say W.C when you mean the bathroom lmfao I guess there are a lot of phrases to go to bathrooms with
    February 11th, 2010 at 03:29am
  • Sundance Kid.

    Sundance Kid. (100)

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    In New England (In the usa) we say wicked. For exaple:
    That test was wicked hard!
    Or
    That movie was so good! Like wicked good!
    Note: Do not use wicked alone. Wicked is to describe adjectives!
    February 12th, 2010 at 03:54am
  • brand_new

    brand_new (100)

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    I'm from England, we spell it like loo.
    When my dad was 18 and on a train to London some American tourists asked him where the restroom was and he thought they meant a room to rest so told them it didn't have one. They looked horrified tehe

    Also I found when we met some Americans that they found the term 'on your bike' hilarious. And when comparing swearwords with a couple of guys from Texas, they said that the word bitch was highly offensive, yet were shocked that the C word was so offensive in England.
    May 4th, 2010 at 12:45am
  • make me a rival

    make me a rival (100)

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    ILoveMyBrownEyedGirl:
    In New England (In the usa) we say wicked. For exaple:
    That test was wicked hard!
    Or
    That movie was so good! Like wicked good!
    Note: Do not use wicked alone. Wicked is to describe adjectives!
    That's just like saying something is 'sick'.

    And, I think it's only my town, but instead of staying 'don't' we say 'duns'. So for example: 'I duns like bugs.'
    May 4th, 2010 at 01:59am
  • richard roman.

    richard roman. (205)

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    I went to The Bahamas, and apparently it's perfectly alright to drink and drive in Nassau.
    November 22nd, 2010 at 10:12pm
  • Your Mom

    Your Mom (250)

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    Everyone in my town is like, obsessed with the word 'legit'... at first it was alright, now it's pretty annoying. -__-"
    December 28th, 2010 at 03:46pm
  • koobyloob

    koobyloob (100)

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    Australia
    If you ever come to Australia here are a couple of things you should NEVER say/ ask.
    (Only because it's really annoying.)

    1. Put another shrimp on the barbie. (What even is a shrimp? We call them prawns)
    2. Do you ride your Kangaroo to school/ work? (Have you seen those things? No way)
    3. Dropbears. (No. Just no.)
    4. Steve Irwin is NOT our king.

    Haha.

    But, we do say things like: Good day mate. How'ya goin bloke. Fuckin oath. ect.
    June 8th, 2012 at 05:57pm
  • marsflor

    marsflor (105)

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    Country: Spain
    A lot of stores and restaurants are closed during the afternoon.
    Lunch is eaten around 2pm and dinner around 8pm.
    In AndalucĂ­a, the accents are a bit different & they tend to stare if they don't know you.
    June 29th, 2013 at 03:23am
  • hiwagang hapis

    hiwagang hapis (1550)

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    Philippines
    Country: Philippines
    It's alright to drive and drink even if you're a minor.
    June 30th, 2013 at 08:33am
  • oh but darling

    oh but darling (100)

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    Country: Japan
    They have these "culture festivals" and the people in school stop school work and make banners, food, and fun stuff. (I think they do it for a week?)

    I thought it was really interesting though! LIKE USA. Y U NO LIEK JAPAN?
    July 16th, 2013 at 02:51am
  • Shi!

    Shi! (105)

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    Well, the first time I went to Italy I was really confused about their usage of the word "prego", first because it means "nail" in Portuguese (it made me laugh every time I heard it) and second because they used it for almost everything.

    For example:

    "May I use this pen?"
    "Of course!" in Italian: "Prego!"

    "Thank you!"
    "You're welcome." in Italian: "Prego."

    If you bump into someone, "I'm sorry"
    "That's okay." in Italian: "Prego."

    Oh God OMG NO!So many nails!
    September 30th, 2014 at 05:43pm
  • hazuki.

    hazuki. (175)

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    When I lived in Brazil, I went with a Brazilian friend to Buenos Aires, Argentina for a few days. Mostly we did fine with only her knowledge of Portuguese since Spanish and Portuguese are a bit similar, but then one day we went to a restaurant and the waiter asked us "propina" and my friend was like, what the hell does this guy want, because apparently in Portuguese (at least Brazilian Portuguese) "propina" is something illegal.
    Then we found out he just wanted his tip Facepalm

    Bth, tipping in Agerntina was a freaking nightmare. Both me and my friend had no idea how much to pay because neither in Germany nor in Brazil people usually tip and in Argentina you're ALWAYS supposed to tip. And some people got real angry at us when we didn't give them enough money tehe
    October 1st, 2014 at 12:05am
  • Shi!

    Shi! (105)

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    @ hazuki.
    Well, "propina" in Portuguese means tuition fees, like the ones you pay in college, so I wouldn't understand what he wanted either! Shifty
    Yeah it sucks that to most of the countries I've visited tipping is "mandatory". In Italy I was shocked when I received the bill from a restaurant and saw that they were charging me 10 extra euros, because they had already included the tip, and they didn't even ask me!
    October 1st, 2014 at 01:30am
  • hazuki.

    hazuki. (175)

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    @ Shi!
    I didn't know that!

    Well, I'm not sure since my Portuguese isn't really good, but I think in Brazil "propina" means "bribe" or something that has to do with corruption? Like when someone pays a politician for a favor or something like that.
    At least I used to hear the word a lot in in political news reports Coffee

    actually most of the times I'm glad when they already include the tip in the bill because I seriously have no clue whatsoever of how much I'm supposed to tip and I don't know if asking is really a good idea. But yeah, it really sucks when people expect you to pay a HUGE tip, especially when you're on a low budget.

    I know this may sound sort of pathetic, but now, when I'm in countries where I know I'm supposed to tip, I mostly buy food from the supermarket or something like that just to avoid tipping tehe or I just leave this part to friends and pay back to them later, that experience in Argentina scarred me for life. Facepalm
    October 1st, 2014 at 02:54am
  • Shi!

    Shi! (105)

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    @ hazuki.
    It doesn't sound pathetic at all, it's actually a very good idea. Wink
    I think I'll start leaving my boyfriend in charge of that. tehe
    October 1st, 2014 at 03:21pm
  • Apteryx

    Apteryx (100)

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    If you're down south (USA, Carolina region specifically), likely you're going to be confused by our rather... Unique grammar and phrases.
    If some one tells you to "get", you best skedaddle and don't wait for the rest of the sentence. It's not coming. They just want you to leave.
    If they say they "used to could" do something, like do a cartwheel, it means they used to be able to, but now they can't. Maybe they "tore up" their knee, or busted/messed it up.
    We use "fixing to" instead of "about to". E.g., "I'm fixing to lick your sorry ass good, boy!" Lick here means to beat.
    If someone says they have a "hankering" for something, they have a craving.
    The post office is just the post, and the grocery store is just the grocery.
    Y'all is a thing, a very prevalent thing. You'll be called sugar, honey, darling and all variations thereof. Men are gentlemanly and women are refined. You'll be expected to be very polite, so break out your "Ma'am"s, "Sir"s, and never, ever, address your elder/superior by their first name. That is just disrespectful as all get out. Always use proper titles.
    John Smith four years your senior is Mr. Smith, and Mr. John only if the two of you have a rapport going and he allows it.
    We also have quite a few colourful phrases, like "colder than a witch's tit in a metal bra in the middle of winter" (very cold), "fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch in the way down" (very ugly), and "need something like you need a hole in the head" (very useless and/or even detrimental).
    If you're from the northern states, tread careful. You're a Yankee (or Yank) in our neighbourhood. Some people don't take kindly to uppity Yankees going around acting like their crap don't stink. (It's nothing personal. We have strict standards of politeness and are easily offended haha. It's a bit of a culture shock!)

    Wow wall of text is giant but I'm southern born and raised, so I might know a a thing or two haha. Nostalgia's a bittersweet thing.
    October 9th, 2014 at 12:25pm