Intrauterine Devices (IUD's) - A Form of Birth Control

  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

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    I need advice about these, and some advice about other things relating to birth control. There's a thread for the pill, but not for IUD's... lock this if it's too close in subject matter though.

    I started taking birth control pills almost 8 months ago, and about two months in, I missed a couple days, took them all on the same day (not at once, followed instructions in the box of BC) and then I puked the next morning and have been nauseous ever since. My doctor's couldn't figure out a cause (and I've seen at least ten in the past six months) and so gave up, telling me that it was all in my head, or caused by an imbalance of hormones, and took me off the myriad of medications I was on, including birth control. I started to feel better, and up to a week ago, I was feeling pretty okay. However, last thursday, I started taking my birth control again, on time with my cycle, because my boyfriend and I are going to be sexually active again. Thing is, when I started taking it again, I started feeling sick. Brain made the connection- Birth control pills make me sick.

    So. I'm looking into other options (and a different pill doesn't seem likely, I've tried three and I've been sick on all of them), and I've been considering IUD's.
    So, my question is, has anyone used a copper IUD? What are the side effects, dangers, positive things, etc?

    And my other question is, if my body doesn't like these hormones, why? Has anyone else run into this problem? Does anyone know what this might hold in future pertaining to having children?

    Please, help, I need advice.

    For those who haven't heard of an IUD before, and are wondering about it, this is a blurb I found.
    Quote
    IUD.

    IUDs are an excellent form of birth control for monogamous women who want a more long-term method that they do not have to think about every day. IUDs can last from 5-10 years depending upon the type you choose. IUDs got a bad rap in the '60s, when they were associated with pelvic infections and infertility. Today's IUDs are safer, and we have learned that Chlamydia was the real culprit in pelvic infections. Today's IUDs are safe for use as long as you are monogamous and therefore not at risk to acquire a sexually transmitted infection. They are inserted with a simple office procedure that takes only a few minutes. The IUD is a great method if you are done with childbearing, or do not want children, yet may not want permanent sterilization. It is also a good choice if you have medical contraindications to hormonal contraception, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, or a history of blood clots.

    IUDs are small, T-shaped pieces of plastic, which contain either copper or a progesterone-releasing system that prevents pregnancy. Your health care provider puts the IUD in the uterus, where it can remain for five years or ten years depending on your preference and the type you and your healthcare provider select. The progesterone-releasing IUD may lessen cramps and bleeding during monthly periods, while the copper IUD may increase cramps and bleeding. The IUD is highly effect in preventing pregnancy, yet is fully reversible. You can start trying to get pregnant as soon as it is removed.You cannot use any type of IUD if you have recently been diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection that affects the lining of the uterus, the fallopian tubes and/or ovaries.
    (source)
    June 21st, 2010 at 11:53pm
  • ella vator.

    ella vator. (100)

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    Well I've never taken any birth control pills so I can't help you there, but I've heard of IUD's before and honestly they seem much more effective than pills because you don't have to remember to take it every day and you don't have to buy a new pack every month. I say go for it.

    Oh and for the side effects, when I read about IUD's, the main side effect from IUD's is apparently a bit of spotting when they're inserted, and after that you should be fine. You can google the side effects, I don't remember what all of them were since it was so long ago, but the side effects aren't as extreme as some of the ones certain kinds of birth control pills can cause.
    June 23rd, 2010 at 05:31am
  • wx12

    wx12 (10125)

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    My gyno has always told me it's normal to nausea on a birth control pill at first, but if it doesn't go away, try switching to a different one, which it seems you have. The hormones in the pill are what makes you sick, and with an IUD, you'll be getting the same hormones, so there is still a chance that you will feel sick again. I've heard, however, that because IUDs do not involve digestion like a pill, nausea can be reduced or eliminated for some people, so it's definitely worth a try for you.

    I don't think there is anything abnormal about your body dislike the hormones when it comes to having kids, that's a pretty common side effect of the pill. For most people it gets better after several months of taking the pill, you're just not lucky it seems. xD

    Like awkward said, I think spotting is the biggest thing, but that's manageable. IUDs have all the same side effects as the pill too (potential blood clots, breast cancer, etc. all increased by smoking)
    June 25th, 2010 at 06:32pm
  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

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    ^I was more wondering about copper IUD's than the estrogen/progesterone IUD. My doctor pretty much shot me down for IUD's anyway, because he said inserting it would be a painful, intrusive and dangerous ordeal, main reason being pelvic inflammatory disease from bacteria being caught in it... and every time you catch it, your chances of having children are reduced by 50%. Which is scary.

    I'm on the Depo-Provera shot now, and my doctor told me that the reason I was reacting aversely was probably the estrogen, which is fairly common, and the shot doesn't have estrogen (It's the only long term BC besides a copper IUD that doesn't) so I can hopefully take it.
    June 26th, 2010 at 04:08am
  • GoAway

    GoAway (100)

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    My friend has a subdermal implant, and she loves it. She told me that it lasts about three years. She is sexually active, and says that this implant is really reliable.
    June 26th, 2010 at 06:27am
  • wx12

    wx12 (10125)

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    lovecraft:
    your chances of having children are reduced by 50%. Which is scary.
    That is terrifying OMG NO! I hope the shot works out for you
    June 27th, 2010 at 05:04am
  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

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    ^I know! When he told me I was like "Nuuuuuuu I want to have babies!"
    June 27th, 2010 at 09:03pm
  • nerdy_

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    There was an episode of House about a nun who had a "golden cross" in her uterus.

    "She has God inside her," I remember House remarked.

    That was what made her sick.... She was allergic to the copper.
    July 17th, 2010 at 01:17am
  • UsagiChaan

    UsagiChaan (155)

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    Have you asked you doctor about Mirena? It might have the hormones you're having a reaction to, but it might be helpful to ask.
    July 17th, 2010 at 02:21am
  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

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    Mirena has the hormones. An IUD would have to be copper if I were to use it.
    Right now I'm on the depo provera shot and it's working okay. I've yet to have a period, but I'm supposed to be getting it now and just suffering from some intense nausea... idk. Maybe my body just hates estrogen. Yippee.
    July 17th, 2010 at 03:05am
  • faster.

    faster. (300)

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    acorna; killer queen:
    Mirena has the hormones. An IUD would have to be copper if I were to use it.
    Right now I'm on the depo provera shot and it's working okay. I've yet to have a period, but I'm supposed to be getting it now and just suffering from some intense nausea... idk. Maybe my body just hates estrogen. Yippee.
    I know this is an old post, but Mirena only has a very small amount of hormones. The hormones aren't what makes it effective, there are just a tiny bit of hormones to relieve cramping. I recently had one placed (juster yesterday) for the same reason, and my doctor assured me that the amount of hormones wouldn't be enough to cause any sort of reaction like I'd had before with so many kinds of birth control.

    That said, does anyone have any experience with Mirena they could share with me? I was pretty uncomfortable all of yesterday, but the cramping is definitely not as bad today, and I think I should be feeling at least close to 100% by tomorrow. I'm hoping all works out with this, because every other type of BC has had been side effects for me... Plus, $20 co-pay for 5 years of birth control is unbelievable! haha. I could definitely get used to that... though I was getting free pills for a while. This is a lot easier.
    August 27th, 2011 at 12:38am
  • The Rumor

    The Rumor (365)

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    Everyone I've ever spoken to who has/had an IUD had problems with it. I know my aunt was seriously ill for ages (years) because hers had slipped and no one realised.
    August 28th, 2011 at 09:10pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    ^
    The ladies I was talking to at work the other day were all for Mirena. The three that are on it [and one of my friends] all say that it's never made them sick, that they don't get periods, and that you can take it out whenever you want.

    After I do some research with my mom, I may be going on it. It would be nice to not have to worry about a pill everyday.
    September 3rd, 2011 at 05:01pm
  • Hannahdoll

    Hannahdoll (100)

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    I had nausea with my birth control when I was taking it in the morning, so I started taking it right before I go to bed. I'm on Sprintec.

    My friend Heather had the Mirena thing, and it made her ill. She had to have it taken out. I've seen commercials for it, and the side effects just sound awful. It would be my luck I'd get the worse side effects.
    September 4th, 2011 at 01:17am
  • GoAway

    GoAway (100)

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    I just got Mirena about a week ago. I chose to get it because I had been taking birth control for two years, but was starting to get sick of having to take it everyday. The process of getting Mirena inserted is pretty painful, not going to lie. Especially if you're younger and haven't had children yet. The cervix is much smaller, and it is therefore hard to place. Sometimes, if the cervix is too small, it literally can't be placed. My doctor wasn't sure it would work for me, but it did. I had cramps the rest of the day, but I've been great ever since then. I'm so glad I got Mirena. The one unexpected thing though, is that I've been spotting ever since I got it. I guess it's normal to bleed for up to 2 weeks after the procedure.

    Anyways, I would definately recommend it. I'm 17 btw. And yeah, it can be removed at any time. It lasts up to 5 years.
    September 4th, 2011 at 06:03am
  • ella vator.

    ella vator. (100)

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    ^ How long did it take to insert it?
    September 5th, 2011 at 08:22pm
  • Name Of Misery.

    Name Of Misery. (100)

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    This is an old thread, but I think that IUDs are really awesome and therefore the thread should be revived.

    IUDs are the most common form of female contraception in the world, with over 150 million users. It isn't as common in the US, though, because of a faulty IUD in the 1970's.

    The nice thing about the hormonal IUD is that it only contains progesterone (and very little of it) so it does not give women the same side effects that estrogen-based birth control gives. The small doses that are mostly secreted in the uterus also makes side effects less because not a lot of it goes into the blood stream. It also lightens periods and reduces cramping.

    The copper IUD is a nice choice as well because it is hormone free, though it is (very slightly) less effective and tends to make periods heavier and cramps worse.

    There is a great community on livejournal called IUD Divas where women post their experiences with the IUDs.
    April 25th, 2013 at 12:21am
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    @ Name Of Misery.
    Actually, we also just had another IUD scare. Mirena has a class-action lawsuit filed against them. That is a hormonal IUD that nearly every woman at my old job used and they all told me I should be on it.

    Another reason I didn't want to go on it was that my nurse practitioner told me that I would have spotting and irregular bleeding for months after beginning it. Since I'm already on the Pill and take it continuously, the idea of spontaneous spotting and bleeding was just not something I was about to deal with.
    April 26th, 2013 at 12:23am
  • Name Of Misery.

    Name Of Misery. (100)

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    @ dru saves the songs
    I have seen that, though it seems that the claims made against Mirena could be made for any hormonal contraceptive, or other IUDs. For example, users are filing complaints because of breast pain, acne and weight gain (side effects known to be caused from hormonal contraceptives), or perforation of the uterus (which can happen with IUDs). I have read reports and studies from various organizations (The CDC for one) and the possibilities of major side effects seem to have been calculated quite well.

    It makes me wonder if women just watched Mirena commercials and then thought they knew everything about it, and got it placed.

    That doesn't mean that there are not serious problems in some women with Mirena, but I have to wonder what many of these women were expecting when taking a hormone-based birth control.

    -

    Yeah, spotting sucks. And some people take months to adjust to that, so they could spot for six months. Not fun.
    April 26th, 2013 at 05:25am
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

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    @ Name Of Misery.
    I have a tendency to doubt it. Just because a class-action lawsuit exists doesn't mean all of the people involved (because it's a lot of women not just one) lied. My friend took Yaz and she was involved in a class-action suit against them because of all the cysts that developed on her lady parts. Shit happens.
    April 26th, 2013 at 02:34pm