Medication for mood disorders.

  • the god of thunder.

    the god of thunder. (300)

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    One of the treatment paths you can take with a mood disorder (such as major depressive, anxiety, or bipolar disorders) is to use medication for stabilization. It seems to be highly dependent on the individual, especially when it comes to how a certain dose or brand affects a particular person, and typically most effective when paired with a secondary treatment outlet.

    What are your opinions on medicine, in regards to yourself? Do you think it's beneficial, or do you prefer to attempt to combat your illnesses in other ways?

    I had always been opposed to medication of any sort, very intolerable of the side effects and skeptical about becoming reliant on an external stabilizer. Now I'm on a low dose of an anxiety-based medicine and I'm finding that it's extremely beneficial in calming my mood, though does not interfere with my normal comfort and functioning.
    July 21st, 2014 at 05:21am
  • FuckNo

    FuckNo (100)

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    I think it should always be something that's done with caution and careful thought. I also think blood tests should be done before any medication is prescribed since there are sometimes deficiencies in other things that could cause symptoms that are diagnosed as mood disorders.

    I used to be on medication, partially because I was misdiagnosed, but I was also given way too high of a dosage to begin with. The combination of it not being the drug I needed (I was experiencing PTSD, not bipolar, and medication isn't really the course of treatment that works best with that) and also way too high of a dosage for my age (200 mg of Zoloft when I was just 14) combined to make matters worse, not better. That being said, on subsequent medications I was switched to on much lower dosages, they did help somewhat.

    I made a personal decision to get off medication since I wanted to try more standard therapy for my needs. I still sometimes have really bad days, but I am slowly getting better. That doesn't mean everyone's condition should be handled that way though. I happen to have a situation where talk therapy is more beneficial than medication, but other people, like people with true depression (I say this, because bereavement is often called depression by people, yet it's not actually depression) probably do need to be medicated if it gets bad enough.
    July 21st, 2014 at 05:35am
  • lozzieee who.

    lozzieee who. (610)

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    CallusedSilk:
    I made a personal decision to get off medication since I wanted to try more standard therapy for my needs. I still sometimes have really bad days, but I am slowly getting better.
    I suffer(ed) from pretty severe clinical depression and was on Prozac, but they switched me to 50mg Citalopram when that didn't work. I took myself off medication because in the end, it was doing more harm than good. I'd take it religiously for several days and feel normal, then I'd leave them at my dad's house, be without them for two days and take a really bad turn.

    Talking therapy worked best for me, but it can get expensive as adult mental health isn't as much a priority on the NHS as child mental health is. These days, when I have a bad day I lock myself in my flat, hole up in my bedroom and sob for a few hours or watch something funny - it doesn't sound like much, but that expression of emotion is like a cleanse. If things get really bad, I'll be use the counselling services provided by my uni. But that's what works for me personally.

    For the most part, I'm for any kind of treatment for mood disorders that helps the individual. Just because they don't work for me, doesn't mean they're not going to work for someone else. It's always worth trying them along with other therapies to see which type of treatment is best.
    October 31st, 2014 at 04:38am
  • eraserhead.

    eraserhead. (150)

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    I've had a fun time with medication, and I say that with complete sarcasm. I've been struggling with depression, generalized anxiety, and PTSD for a few years now but only just got medicated for it in 2013. When I was on my first anxiety/depression medication (it worked for both depending on the dosage), I saw a slight change but was still relatively unhappy. After adding another for terrible, graphic nightmares, I just found that I was drowsy most of the time.

    A year later, I was re diagnosed with a seizure disorder and was put on a medication that messed with my head bad enough to be put in an inpatient program at a nearby hospital. They recognized that I needed a change in medication immediately and started me on one that treats seizures as well as bi-polar, and though I don't suffer from manic-depressive disorder, it changed my mood within a few days. Granted, I was also getting off of the bad seizure medication, but I suddenly had all this energy and a drive to actually get up and do things. Way different from lying in bed all day every day.

    I've been seeing a therapist for over a year now, and that helps a lot with the processing of things, but people need to know some skills as well (breathing exercising, stretching, even coloring can help), medicated or not.

    My long term goal is to get off of my anti-anxiety/anti-depressant and just be on the anti-epileptics, but it could take a while.

    Now that I've told my life story, I'd just like to say that it can take a long time to get put on the right meds. It's all trial and error, and even if it's terrible to wait it out while feeling miserable, once you find the one(s) that work for you, it's incredible.

    Some people believe that divine intervention is the only way to be cured of mental illnesses like depression and anxiety. They rely on their spirituality, and while there's nothing necessarily wrong with that, I think that in a lot of cases, medication is definitely required if you want to be a function-able human being. It is science. Having disorders like these means that there is a chemical imbalance inside of you. There's nothing wrong with it, but without balancing the out, it can be devastating.
    October 31st, 2014 at 07:20am
  • faster.

    faster. (300)

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    I think medications can work really well for some people, if they're on the right thing, but I don't think it's something doctors should aim to keep you on forever like some seem to. Of course, there will be those people who may need medication for all or most of their lives, but I don't think it's most people. Paxil worked well for me for a little bit, but eventually I started to realize that I felt better on the days I forgot to take it, so I just stopped, took half a pill when I started feeling crazy, and then was fine up until the present (though I would recommend talking to your doctor and not doing it that way if you do feel it's time to stop any medications). So they can definitely help, but at the same time I feel like doctors are too fast to prescribe things sometimes and that sometimes things crap out on you after a while, etc.
    December 11th, 2014 at 01:52am
  • the god of mischief.

    the god of mischief. (250)

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    The only way I would suggest starting a medication regimen is to have it be approved/recommended through a series of doctors, rather than just one. Unless you're going for something so low-dose that your run of the mill MD could prescribe it. Some medications have very adverse side-effects and should only be taken in extreme circumstances and with a "Pill popping" culture emerging in America (between diet pills and amphetamines and neutropics) some doctors are too quick to prescribe and some family members/peers are too apt to support it. It's a decision that is best made between a team/crew of doctors (even if it's not an official team, just a few different opinions you've gathered alone) and the person considering taking them, with little to no outside influence on the situation.

    That being said, the proper medication can help a great deal. And while I wouldn't suggest quitting it without supervision from someone (preferably who knows you very well) it can be stopped over time or even just adjusted. There's nothing shameful or wrong about it, so long as it's prescribed and taken responsibly. Cute
    May 24th, 2015 at 04:50am