Mibba Guidelines: Books Guidelines and How-To's

  • Audrey T

    Audrey T (6730)

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    Books Guidelines and How-To's


    All of Mibba's site rules and guidelines can be found in our Knowledge Base.
    Below you'll find some minimized versions of some of the Knowledge Base's important articles.
    (Click the links below to be taken to the appropriate sections.)
    May 4th, 2015 at 05:37am
  • Audrey T

    Audrey T (6730)

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    Books Guidelines


    01. Mibba's Books section is only for professionally published books.

    If you want to post your writing to the site, please check out the guidelines and how-to's threads for stories, poems, blogs, or articles (depending on what type of writing you'd like to share.

    02. To help build our Books section, Mibbians are encouraged to submit books.

    We'd like to have a listing for as many published books as possible, so if you search our Books section for a novel and it isn't there, feel free to submit it.

    03. We only need 1 listing for each books.

    So if a book is already listed, please do not submit it again.

    04. Users get 5 points for each book added.

    Once your book is added to our Books section, 5 points will be added to your total count (you can see your current points count next to your username and icon.

    05. All summaries included with your book submission must be original.

    This means, you must create a summary for the book in your own words. You cannot copy and paste a summary from another source.

    06. The Books section is interactive.

    You can add books to your personal books list (found on your profile page) by going to the book's page and clicking the 'Yes' button next to the question, Did you read this book? You can also recommend the book to your friends by clicking the 'recommend' button at the top left corner of the book's page. Lastly, you can comment and discuss the book with other Mibbians by clicking the 'comment' tab at the top of the page.
    * You can also find this information in the
    Knowledge Base article A Guide to Books
    and the Mibba Magazine article
    Mibba's Books Is Open and Awaiting Submissions
    May 4th, 2015 at 05:50am
  • Audrey T

    Audrey T (6730)

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    Book Types and Genres


    Book Types

    Drama- Scripts, plays, and other theatrical pieces written in script format.

    Prose - Novels, short stories, essays, and other pieces told in a typical narrative. It also includes graphic novels and other pieces that falls under that category (comic books, manga...).

    Poetry: - Poems and and poem anthologies. These are basically pieces written in verse.

    Book Genres

    Fiction

    Adventure stories: A type of fictitious story that usually revolves around an exotic quest or journey that is often dangerous or challenging.

    Alternative histories: A type of fictitious story that focuses on an actual historical event, but alters the outcome of the event.

    Bildungsromans: A type of fictitious story that tells a coming of age story. The story usually focuses on a child’s life as they grow into an adult.

    Biographical fiction: A type of fictitious story that is based on the life of an actual person; however, the story contains details that are not factual or fabricated.

    Chick lit: A type of fictitious story geared towards women. Typically the story focuses on a young, female protagonist and her daily life, especially aspects of life involving love.

    Children's stories: A type of fictitious story aimed at young children that often teaches some sort of moral or ideal.

    Christian fiction: A type of fictitious story that revolves around actual figures important to Christianity with fabricated details.

    Code and cipher: A type of fictitious story often involving computer hacking or some other sort of code-breaking.

    College Fiction: A type of fictitious story that addresses the college life style, typically told from the perspective of a student.

    Diary fiction: A type of fictitious story written as if it is a diary, typically with entry dates and told from first person point of view.

    Didactic fiction: A type of fictitious story that was clearly written not merely for entertainment, but with a blatant and clear purpose.

    Dime novels: A type of fictitious story that plays off trends and includes a sensationalized plot often written purely for the purpose of making money. The term typically applies to novels written in the 1800s, however it can be applied to modern books figuratively.

    Domestic fiction: A type of fictitious story that discusses home and family life.

    Dystopian fiction: A type of fictitious story where a treacherous and nightmarish world is created.

    Epistolary fiction: A type of fictitious story that is told primarily in the form of messages between characters. Types of messages include letters, emails, instant messages, etc.

    Erotic: A type of fictitious story that expresses strong sexual themes.

    Experimental: A type of fictitious story that uses uncommon or innovative writing techniques, such as a peculiar narrative style or unique portrayal of time.

    Fables: A classic type of fictitious story that teaches a moral through an unrealistic story. Animals are often personified in fables.

    Fan fiction: A type of fictitious story that revolves around a key social or cultural figure.

    Fantasy: A type of fictitious story that is extremely imaginative and unrealistic.

    Feminist fiction: A type of fictitious story that describes the life of a female protagonist, often dealing with some sort of struggle in life, particularly a struggle for fair treatment.

    Feuilletons: A type of fictitious story that often focuses on gossip within a particular area, sometimes told with an omniscient narrator.

    Film novelizations: A type of fictitious story that is based on a film.

    Framework stories: A type of fictitious novel where seemingly unrelated tales are told within another story, often narrated by characters within the story.

    Ghost stories: A type of fictitious story involving ghosts and paranormal activity.

    Gothic: A type of fictitious story that combines both horror and romance. Characters are often supernatural or mythical, such as vampires or demons.

    Graphic novels: A type of fictitious story told in the format on a comic book; the novel focuses on either one main story, or several interrelated story with illustrations.

    Historical fiction: A type of fictitious story based on an actual historical event with some fabricated details for entertainment and emotional value.

    Horror: A type of fictitious story involving shocking and scary events.

    Humor: A type of fictitious story designed to be comical and entertaining for the reader.

    Legal: A type of fictitious story that involves court cases or some sort of conflict with laws. Typically, one of the central characters will either be a lawyer or judge.

    Legends: A type of fictitious story that tells an ancient story or myth essentially known to be fictitious.

    Martial Arts: A type of fictitious story involving some sort of martial art, such as karate. The story is often set in Japan or China, but not always.

    Medical fiction: A type of fictitious story involving hospitals, doctors or health related events.

    Musical fiction: A type of fiction that deals with music as a subject matter, and also has lyrical and musical qualities in the writing techniques.

    Mystery: A type of fictitious story involving some sort of puzzling or unknown event. Typically, the protagonist attempts to solve the mystery.

    Nature stories: A type of fictitious story that addressees environmental concerns and centers around a natural theme.

    New Age fiction: A type of fictitious story similar to science fiction; however, stories are either modern or futuristic, and deal with spiritual themes as well as scientific.

    Noir fiction: A type of fictitious story dealing with sinister and dark mysteries.

    Occult fiction: A type of fictitious story that revolves around witchcraft, voodooism, spiritualism and supernatural phenomena.

    Picaresque: A type of fictitious story that uses satire and humor to tell the story of an often low-class citizen living in a corrupt setting.

    Multi-plot: A type of fictitious story often told in second person perspective where a reader must make choices that alter the plot.

    Political fiction: A type of fictitious story that is based on some sort of governmental theme or politician’s life.

    Religious fiction: A type of fictitious story that is based on actual religions with fabricated people or events for entertainment purposes.

    Romance: A type of fictitious story that tells a story of love and relationships, usually with some sort of conflict standing between the two people in love.

    Science fiction: A type of fictitious story that deals with scientific impossibilities and experiments.

    Serialized fiction: A type of fictitious collection of stories that are related and often share characters or themes. Serialized fiction can be published as one collection of stories or individual books.

    Short stories: A type of fictitious story that is short in length and often has a quick moving plot.

    Sports fiction: A type of fictitious story that involves athletics and athletes.

    Spy fiction: A type of fictitious story that involves espionage and secrecy.

    Suspense fiction: A type of fictitious story that includes thrilling events that lead to anticipation, and often includes some sort of crime, intrigue or puzzling situation.

    Urban fiction: A type of fictitious story that is set in a large city and often involves gang activity or crime.

    Utopian fiction: A type of fictitious story where a seemingly perfect and ideal world is created.

    War stories: A type of fictitious story that involves either a war that actually occurred, or a fabricated war. The story is often told from the perspective of a soldier or military official.

    Western stories: A type of fictitious story that is typically set in the developing western United States. Unruly characters and a lack of laws are common themes.

    Young Adult: A type of fictitious story geared towards teenagers. Typically, the protagonist is a teenager dealing with the struggles of daily life. Drugs, love, sex and identity are common themes

    Nonfiction

    Almanac: An annual publication on a specific field or subject, such as astronomy or economics.

    Autobiography: A true account of a person’s life as told by his or herself.

    Biography: A true account of a person’s life as told by someone else.

    Creative nonfiction: A factual account of an actual event, told with literary style as opposed to textbook-style reading.

    Diary: Similar to an autobiography, a diary is an actual account of someone’s thoughts as told by his or herself.

    Encyclopedia: A collection of factual articles dealing with all aspects of life and the world.

    History: A factual account of a historical event or ancient society.

    Literary criticism: A critique of a piece of literature

    Memoir: A factual account of part of someone’s life, as told by his or herself.

    Philosophy: A book discussing life, values, morals, knowledge, mind or reason.

    Photography: A book composed of photographs.

    Poetry Anthologies: A collection of poems, sometimes accompanied by a short poet biography.

    Science: A book that offers accurate and factual information on some discipline of science.

    Travel: A book that offers information and facts about a travel destination.
    * You can also find this information in the
    Knowledge Base article Book Genres.
    May 4th, 2015 at 05:52am
  • Audrey T

    Audrey T (6730)

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    Submitting a Book


    Before submitting a book, please make sure the book hasn't already been submitted to Mibba. You can do so by using the search bar located at the top of the main Books page.

    If the book isn't already on Mibba, here's how to submit a new book.

    You can get to a new book submission page in one of two ways:orOnce you're on the new book submission page, fill in all of the necessary information and press submit. Be sure to include the book's correct information, an original description, and a link to a copy of the book's cover.

    When you've submitted the book, a Mibba story editor will look over your submission and publish the book to our Books section.

    If you have any questions about Mibba's Books section, feel free to contact any of Mibba's Story Editors via private message or profile comment.
    * You can also find this information in the
    Knowledge Base article A Guide to Books
    and the Mibba Magazine article
    Mibba's Books Is Open and Awaiting Submissions
    May 4th, 2015 at 06:11am
  • Audrey T

    Audrey T (6730)

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    Books FAQs


    Can I submit my writing to the Books section?

    No. Mibba's Books section is for published books (for example, books you can purchase at a store or borrow from a library). Unless you're a professionally published writer, your writing should not be submitted to Mibba's book section.

    If you'd like to post your stories or poems to Mibba so other Mibbians can read them, please check out the stories or poems guidelines threads.

    What should I put in the description box?

    The description box is where you should put a short description (or summary) of the book. This can be something similar to what you'd find written on the back of a novel. Make sure it is written in your own words, and not copied from another source.

    Should I list this book type as a 'drama'?

    Only list scripts and plays as dramas.

    What should I do if a book has more than one author?

    If a book has more than one author, for example Good Omens, list all authors unless it is an anthology. In the case of anthologies, for example The Faery Reel, list the editor(s).

    What if the book has been written by one person and translated by another?

    If the book has an author and a translator, for example Beowulf, list the original author. You can include the translator in your description.

    What if the book was written by an author under a pseudonym?

    If the book was written under a pseudonym, for example The Cuckoo's Calling, list the name the book was published under. (So, instead of listing the book as J.K. Rowling, you would list it as Robert Galbraith.

    What if the book appears to have more than one publishing date?

    If the book appears to have more than one publishing date (for example, if it was re-published years after it was first published), please list the oldest publishing date available.

    What if a book has been translated into many languages?

    If a book has been widely translated, always pick the language it was originally published in. For example, although Dante's Divine Comedies have been translated in many languages, it was originally written in Italian, so you would list the language as Italian.

    Some books have many different covers. Which one should I choose?

    If a book has different covers available, feel free to choose whichever you want.

    What if I'm unsure of the book's publishing date or genre?

    If you're not 100% on some of the book's information, you can try browsing site's like Good Reads. They often have the most accurate information on things like publishing dates, authors, and genres, as well as book covers.

    If you have any questions about Mibba's Books section, feel free to post here or contact any of Mibba's Story Editors via private message or profile comment.
    May 4th, 2015 at 06:12am