Should It Be Legal to Pierce Your Infant Child's Ears?

  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    Basically stemmed from the circumcision thread.

    Should it be legal to pierce your infant child's ears?

    And what about facial piercings?

    Why or why not? Do you think there should be an age limit?

    ---

    I'm against infant ear piercing. I think the child should at least be old enough to say they want their ears pierced and be able to articulate why even if it's as simple as 'it's pretty'.
    February 7th, 2011 at 06:55pm
  • sunflowers.

    sunflowers. (300)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    tehe okay, like I said from the previous discussion:

    Maybe it's cultural for me (my grandma has her nose pierced and everything) but what do you think is the actual harm in it? Do you think there is any harm in it, or is it a case of simply not making decisions like this on behalf of the child?
    February 7th, 2011 at 06:57pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    sunflowers.:
    Maybe it's cultural for me (my grandma has her nose pierced and everything) but what do you think is the actual harm in it? Do you think there is any harm in it, or is it a case of simply not making decisions like this on behalf of the child?
    I think body modifications should be the decision of the individual. I shouldn't be able to force my child to get a piercing, a tattoo, plastic surgery, etc.

    Piercings done as an infant and not removed until later in life will take years to close up. It's not a "quick fix".

    But I don't think a child should have to be twelve or something for ear piercings. A four year old can articulate that they want something and why. As long as they say they want it, I'm okay with it.
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:00pm
  • sunflowers.

    sunflowers. (300)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    sometimes dru hurts.:
    I think body modifications should be the decision of the individual. I shouldn't be able to force my child to get a piercing, a tattoo, plastic surgery, etc.

    Piercings done as an infant and not removed until later in life will take years to close up. It's not a "quick fix".

    But I don't think a child should have to be twelve or something for ear piercings. A four year old can articulate that they want something and why. As long as they say they want it, I'm okay with it.
    But if the piercing is done as a baby (on an additional note, I DON'T think a baby should have anything pierced before 1 year old, because if something goes wrong, such as infection developing, it's more likely to cause a serious problem for a baby that young), and then by the age of 3/4 they can articulate whether they want the piercing in or not, then that's only around 2/3 years?
    If it's then taken out, it should close up in a couple of years (I know it depends from person to person though).

    And would you really put ear piercing on the same scale as tattoos and plastic surgery, both of which are near irreversible? If you take out an earring, before it heals, it's nothing more than a tiny spot on your ear, less than a birthmark.
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:05pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    sunflowers.:
    But if the piercing is done as a baby (on an additional note, I DON'T think a baby should have anything pierced before 1 year old, because if something goes wrong, such as infection developing, it's more likely to cause a serious problem for a baby that young), and then by the age of 3/4 they can articulate whether they want the piercing in or not, then that's only around 2/3 years?
    If it's then taken out, it should close up in a couple of years (I know it depends from person to person though).
    I don't think something that takes a few years to reverse is necessary until it's articulated the child wants it.
    Quote
    And would you really put ear piercing on the same scale as tattoos and plastic surgery, both of which are near irreversible? If you take out an earring, before it heals, it's nothing more than a tiny spot on your ear, less than a birthmark.
    Not the same scale, but it is body modification. And you will have a mark on your ear that you don't want, so you're permanently modifying the body.

    ---

    And what about other piercings? Is it okay to pierce my child's nose?

    And where does one get an infant's ears pierced? I think informed consent is required to get a tattoo/piercing done.
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:10pm
  • fool's paradise

    fool's paradise (1000)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United States
    sometimes dru hurts.:
    And where does one get an infant's ears pierced?
    You would go to the pediatrician, wouldn't you?
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:15pm
  • sunflowers.

    sunflowers. (300)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    sometimes dru hurts.:
    Not the same scale, but it is body modification. And you will have a mark on your ear that you don't want, so you're permanently modifying the body.

    ---

    And what about other piercings? Is it okay to pierce my child's nose?
    A nose leaves a far more visible mark, since it's right on your face, they're considered to be more painful and from what I've heard have a higher chance of infection than a simple ear piercing.

    Well, I personally don't see a problem with adding the tiniest freckle-like mark to my child's ear. Nor have I ever met anyone who was angry at the fact that their parents pierced their ears as a baby (being Indian, where it's not uncommon I have met a number of people who've had their ears pierced when 2 or 3). In fact, I've got friends now who want their ears pierced but are scared of needles, so partly wish their parents had just done it for them when they were a baby -shrug-
    sometimes dru hurts.:
    And where does one get an infant's ears pierced? I think informed consent is required to get a tattoo/piercing done.
    I got mine done at Selfridges, which is a big department store. Babies all over the place have their ears pierced, so it seems like when the child is that young, all you need is parents permission.
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:16pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    sunflowers.:
    A nose leaves a far more visible mark, since it's right on your face, they're considered to be more painful and from what I've heard have a higher chance of infection than a simple ear piercing.
    An infant has a much greater risk of their ear getting infect from a piercing because they'll touch it a lot more and won't be able to vocalize if it hurts/itches/etc.
    Quote
    Well, I personally don't see a problem with adding the tiniest freckle-like mark to my child's ear. Nor have I ever met anyone who was angry at the fact that their parents pierced their ears as a baby (being Indian, where it's not uncommon I have met a number of people who've had their ears pierced when 2 or 3). In fact, I've got friends now who want their ears pierced but are scared of needles, so partly wish their parents had just done it for them when they were a baby -shrug-
    I've met people who have so... some do, some don't.
    Quote
    I got mine done at Selfridges, which is a big department store. Babies all over the place have their ears pierced, so it seems like when the child is that young, all you need is parents permission.
    That's pretty jacked up. When you're an infant parents can mess with you, but when you're older you have to give consent. Think
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:22pm
  • The Rumor

    The Rumor (365)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    Great Britain (UK)
    fool's paradise:
    You would go to the pediatrician, wouldn't you?
    No, jewellery and department stores tend to be the places to go.
    sometimes dru hurts.:
    But I don't think a child should have to be twelve or something for ear piercings. A four year old can articulate that they want something and why. As long as they say they want it, I'm okay with it.
    But, a four year old can articulate a lot of things that they want that they shouldn't really get (like ice-cream for dinner and absolutely no bedtime even if they're exhausted).
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:25pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    The Rumor:
    But, a four year old can articulate a lot of things that they want that they shouldn't really get (like ice-cream for dinner and absolutely no bedtime even if they're exhausted).
    Right. And it's still up to the parents to make the final decision. It would be up to the parents to decide to pierce their child's ears after the child has stated they want it.
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:28pm
  • sunflowers.

    sunflowers. (300)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    The Rumor:
    But, a four year old can articulate a lot of things that they want that they shouldn't really get (like ice-cream for dinner and absolutely no bedtime even if they're exhausted).
    But earrings are purely aesthetic, really. I mean, ice cream for dinner is bad for you, no bedtime is also bad for a little kid. They hurt a bit, and as a parent you've got to clean the piercing, but that aside I see very little harm in letting a little child get the piercing?
    February 7th, 2011 at 07:28pm
  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    Canada
    http://www.ghorayeb.com/AURICULAR_ABSCESSGG.JPG

    WARNING: sort of grossly graphic.

    That's an infected ear piercing.

    As well, the chances are extremely slim, and probably negligible, but there are risks for paralysis following an ear piercing infection, as there's a lot of nerve endings where you would get a tragus piercing, I believe.

    What about plugs? I don't know much about them, but I do know that the stretching is often irreversible completely. Should parents be allowed to stick those in their two-year old's ears?
    February 7th, 2011 at 08:32pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    The Rumor:
    No, jewellery and department stores tend to be the places to go.
    Not necessarily, my mom's a GP and she regularly pierces baby's ears. A lot of parents trust a doctor more than somebody working at a jewelery or department store so that's why they want a pediatrician or GP to do it.
    dru is by your side.:
    I think body modifications should be the decision of the individual. I shouldn't be able to force my child to get a piercing, a tattoo, plastic surgery, etc.
    What would you define as plastic surgery? A lot of parents get their children surgery or make them wear uncomfortable braces if they have mild or moderate scoliosis although there's no conclusive proof that mild and moderate scoliosis causes health problems.
    February 7th, 2011 at 08:36pm
  • lovecraft

    lovecraft (100)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    Canada
    ^It IS the most sanitary/safest place to do it, I'm imagine.

    Does she have piercings for sale, or do parents bring them in? What sort of tools does she use?
    February 7th, 2011 at 08:39pm
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    acorna; eet:
    ^It IS the most sanitary/safest place to do it, I'm imagine.

    Does she have piercings for sale, or do parents bring them in? What sort of tools does she use?
    She doesn't sell piercings, though she can recommend parents what kind to buy. I think she uses some kind of disposable sterilized needle. Some doctors use a piercing gun, but you can't sterilize that properly so needles are much safer.
    February 7th, 2011 at 08:48pm
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    Mr W. H.:
    What would you define as plastic surgery? A lot of parents get their children surgery or make them wear uncomfortable braces if they have mild or moderate scoliosis although there's no conclusive proof that mild and moderate scoliosis causes health problems.
    Maybe cosmetic surgery would have been a better term. I mean I shouldn't be able to force my daughter to get breast implants or force my son to get a nose job (deviated septum would obviously be a reason to get one, but just because I think his nose is too big, no).

    I also have mild scoliosis. I never wore a brace, which I was happy about, but I do have bad posture and I get back pain easier than my siblings.
    February 7th, 2011 at 09:44pm
  • The Rumor

    The Rumor (365)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    Great Britain (UK)
    Mr W. H.:
    Not necessarily, my mom's a GP and she regularly pierces baby's ears. A lot of parents trust a doctor more than somebody working at a jewelery or department store so that's why they want a pediatrician or GP to do it.
    Oh okay, my bad. I didn't think doctors did that. Thank you for correcting me.
    February 8th, 2011 at 12:12am
  • sunflowers.

    sunflowers. (300)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    23
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    dru is by your side.:
    Maybe cosmetic surgery would have been a better term. I mean I shouldn't be able to force my daughter to get breast implants or force my son to get a nose job (deviated septum would obviously be a reason to get one, but just because I think his nose is too big, no).

    I also have mild scoliosis. I never wore a brace, which I was happy about, but I do have bad posture and I get back pain easier than my siblings.
    Again, I don't think that's anywhere near the same scale as a simple ear piercing.
    The health risks are greater, it's illegal, it's more drastic a change and it's much harder to reverse.

    What do you think about braces (as in orthodontic braces)? They can result in a pretty much permanent change to your teeth, but even at an older age parents often make such a decision on their child's behalf?
    February 8th, 2011 at 12:49am
  • folie a dru.

    folie a dru. (1270)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    30
    Location:
    United States
    sunflowers.:
    What do you think about braces (as in orthodontic braces)? They can result in a pretty much permanent change to your teeth, but even at an older age parents often make such a decision on their child's behalf?
    There's a medical reason to get braces. There's no medical reason to pierce a child's ears.
    February 8th, 2011 at 12:53am
  • kafka.

    kafka. (150)

    :
    Member
    Gender:
    Age:
    25
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    dru is by your side.:
    There's a medical reason to get braces. There's no medical reason to pierce a child's ears.
    There's no valid medical reason for wanting straight teeth. On the contrary, some doctors are against braces because they prevent the natural movement of face bones and create tension in face and neck muscles.
    February 8th, 2011 at 08:39am